Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 2-17-24

A used unwashed black t-shirt worn by Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong during the promotion of the band’s American Idiot album sold for $2500 at a charity auction, with the proceeds going to the Oakland School of the Arts. I would love to dispose of my laundry pile the same way, but I doubt anybody would pay more than $400 for my sweat-stained socks.

Billie Joe Armstrong was born on this date in 1972. Tracks from his band are included on today’s playlist.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents 1985

The year 1985 was a remarkable one for music, as it showcased a variety of genres, styles, and influences. From pop to rock, from synth to soul, from rap to reggae, the music of 1985 reflected the diversity and creativity of the artists and the listeners. Whether it was the catchy melodies, the powerful lyrics, or the innovative sounds, the music of 1985 had something for everyone.

One of the most notable trends of 1985 was the emergence of new wave and synth-pop, which dominated the charts and the airwaves. Artists like Tears for Fears, a-Ha, Simple Minds, and The Cure blended synthesizers, guitars, and drums to create catchy and memorable songs that captured the mood and the spirit of the times. Songs like “Everybody Wants To Rule The World”, “Take On Me”, “Don’t You (Forget About Me)”, and “Close to Me” became anthems for a generation that was looking for fun, freedom, and adventure.

Another trend of 1985 was the influence of dance and disco, which brought energy and excitement to the music scene. Artists like Madonna, Frankie Goes To Hollywood, Dead Or Alive, and Sade combined dance beats, catchy hooks, and sensual vocals to create songs that made people want to move and groove. Songs like “Into the Groove”, “Relax”, “You Spin Me Round (Like A Record)”, and “Smooth Operator” became hits that defined the style and the attitude of the era.

A third trend of 1985 was the resurgence of rock and roll, which showed the diversity and the versatility of the genre. Artists like Bruce Springsteen, Prince, Dire Straits, and The Smiths demonstrated their musical skills, their lyrical talents, and their artistic visions. Songs like “Born In The U.S.A.”, “Raspberry Beret”, “Money For Nothing”, and “How Soon Is Now” became classics that showcased the range and the depth of rock music.

A fourth trend of 1985 was the rise of social awareness and activism, which inspired many artists to use their music as a platform for change and charity. Artists took part in USA For Africa and Band Aid to raise funds and awareness for famine relief.

The music of 1985 was a year of diversity and innovation, as it offered a wide range of musical experiences and expressions. The playlist below features some of the best songs of 1985, which represent the different trends and influences of the year. Enjoy the music and relive the memories of 1985!

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Tunes Du Jour Presents 2002


The year 2002 was a turbulent one for the world, marked by wars, terrorism, scandals, and natural disasters. But it was also a year of creativity, innovation, and diversity in music. From hip-hop to rock, from pop to indie, from dance to folk, the music of 2002 reflected the mood and spirit of the times, offering both escapism and commentary, both nostalgia and novelty, both challenge and comfort.

One of the most dominant genres of the year was hip-hop, which reached new heights of popularity and influence. Eminem’s Lose Yourself became an anthem of determination and resilience, while Missy Elliott’s Work It showcased her inventive and playful style. Nelly’s Hot in Herre was a summer smash, while Clipse’s Grindin’ introduced a minimalist and gritty sound. Tweet and Missy Elliott’s Oops (Oh My) was a sensual and empowering ode to self-love, while Truth Hurts and Rakim’s Addictive sampled a Bollywood song and sparked a controversy. Cam’ron’s Oh Boy featured a catchy sample of Rose Royce’s I’m Going Down, while Khia’s My Neck, My Back (Lick It) was a raunchy and explicit hit.

Rock music also had a strong presence in 2002, with a variety of styles and sounds. Elvis Presley’s A Little Less Conversation (JXL Edit) was a remix of a 1968 song that became a worldwide hit, thanks to its inclusion in a Nike commercial. Avril Lavigne’s Complicated was a pop-rock anthem for the rebellious and misunderstood youth, while Coldplay’s In My Place was a melancholic and soaring ballad. The Strokes’ Hard to Explain was a garage rock revival, while Wilco’s Jesus, Etc. was a country-rock masterpiece. Interpol’s Obstacle 1 was a post-punk gem, while Spoon’s The Way We Get By was a catchy and quirky indie rock tune. The Libertines’ What a Waster was a punk rock blast, while Bruce Springsteen’s The Rising was a tribute to the victims and heroes of 9/11.

Pop music also had its share of hits and surprises in 2002, with some old and new faces. Christina Aguilera’s Dirrty was a provocative and edgy reinvention, while Beyonce’s Work It Out was a funky and soulful solo debut. Brandy’s What About Us was a futuristic and sleek R&B track, while No Doubt’s Hella Good was a disco and rock fusion. Bjork’s Pagan Poetry was a haunting and experimental song, while Las Ketchup’s Asereje was a catchy and silly novelty. Alanis Morissette’s Hands Clean was a confessional and catchy pop-rock song, while Rufus Wainwright’s Across the Universe was a beautiful and faithful cover of the Beatles classic.

Some of the most memorable songs of 2002 were not easily categorized, but rather blended genres and styles. Sugababes’ Freak Like Me was a mash-up of Adina Howard’s Freak Like Me and Gary Numan’s Are ‘Friends’ Electric?, creating a pop and electro masterpiece. The Flaming Lips’ Do You Realize?? was a psychedelic and uplifting song, while X-Press 2’s Lazy was a house and spoken word collaboration with David Byrne. The Streets’ Weak Become Heroes was a rap and piano tribute to rave culture, while Doves’ There Goes The Fear was a rock and electronic epic.

The music of 2002 was a reflection of the year itself: diverse, unpredictable, exciting, and sometimes challenging. It was a year of contrasts and surprises, of highs and lows, of old and new. It was a year that gave us some of the most memorable songs of the 21st century, and a year that we can revisit through this playlist. Enjoy!

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Tunes Du Jour Presents Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley was more than just a singer. He was a cultural icon, a musical innovator, and a philanthropist. His legacy lives on in his songs, his movies, and his charitable deeds.

Elvis’s musical contributions are undeniable. He popularized a new style of music that blended elements of blues, country, gospel, and pop. He influenced countless artists, from the Beatles to Bruce Springsteen, and inspired generations of fans. He recorded over 700 songs, many of which became classics, such as “Jailhouse Rock,” “Hound Dog,” “Heartbreak Hotel,” and “Suspicious Minds.” He won three Grammy Awards, a Lifetime Achievement Award, and was inducted into several halls of fame. He sold over one billion records worldwide, making him the best-selling solo artist of all time.

Elvis’s philanthropic efforts are less known, but equally impressive. He was generous with his time, talent, and money, supporting various causes and organizations. He donated to the March of Dimes, the American Cancer Society, the American Library Association, and many others. He gave thousands of teddy bears to children’s hospitals, paid off people’s debts and mortgages, and performed benefit concerts for the USS Arizona Memorial, the Cynthia Milk Fund, and the Kui Lee Cancer Fund. He recorded songs that addressed social issues, such as “In the Ghetto” and “If I Can Dream.”

Elvis’s impact on music and society is still felt today, more than 40 years after his death. His songs are still played on the radio, his movies are still watched on TV, and his fans are still loyal and passionate. His Graceland mansion is a museum and a shrine, visited by millions of people every year. His image is still recognizable and iconic, inspiring countless impersonators and tributes.

Elvis Presley was the King of Rock and Roll and a generous soul. He gave us his music, his movies, and his charity. He gave us his heart, his soul, and his love. He gave us the wonder of him.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 10-21-23

“This is a song I wrote for my first album. It was the only song I ever wrote that was a Top 10 hit. It wasn’t for me, it was for a group called Manfred Mann’s Earth Band. They were a great band, but they changed the lyrics. And it pissed me off. Because I have a big ego. And I wanted to hear my words coming out of the radio. But they had a hit, so I was happy about that. But what they did was, they took out one of my lines and they put in one of their own. And their line became one of the most misunderstood lines of all time. In my version, the line went: ‘Cut loose like a deuce, another runner in the night.’ A deuce is a 1932 Ford Coupe, a very hot car back in the day. But they changed it to: ‘Blinded by the light, revved up like a deuce, you know the runner in the night.’ Now that makes no sense. But that’s OK, because it rhymed. But then people started to mishear that line. And they misheard it as: ‘Blinded by the light, wrapped up like a douche, another rumor in the night.’ A douche is not a car. It’s a feminine hygiene product. And it doesn’t even rhyme! So I don’t know how they got that. But that’s what people heard. And that’s what they’ve been singing for 40 years.” – Bruce Springsteen

Manfred Mann was born Manfred Lubowitz on this date in 1940. A few of his hits are on today’s playlist.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 8-12-23

I’m generally not one for guitar solos, but Mark Knopfler’s work on this record, particularly starting at around the 4:50 mark, coupled with the main riff, sends me every time.

Dire Straits’ Mark Knopfler was born on this date in 1949. Some of his band’s best work is included on today’s playlist.

https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/6CHpLkNnuZCozgaFTHkQGO?utm_source=generator

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