Tunes Du Jour Presents Power Pop

If you’re looking for a genre of music that combines catchy melodies, energetic guitars, and irresistible hooks, look no further than power pop. Power pop is a style of rock music that emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s, influenced by the British Invasion, the Beatles, and the Beach Boys. Power pop songs are typically short, upbeat, and radio-friendly, with lyrics that often deal with love, romance, and youth.

In this playlist, I’ve compiled some of the best examples of power pop from different decades and countries, featuring both classic and modern bands. Whether you’re a fan of the genre or just curious, I hope you’ll enjoy these tunes as much as I do.

## The Pioneers

The oldest track on the playlist is “Paperback Writer” by the Beatles, one of the earliest and most influential power pop songs. The Beatles were a huge inspiration for many power pop bands, especially with their use of harmonies, guitar riffs, and catchy choruses. Other tracks from this era include “Go All the Way” by Raspberries, “Day After Day” by Badfinger, and “September Gurls” by Big Star, all of which showcase the power pop sound of the 1970s.

## The Revival

Also on the playlist are some of the bands that revived the power pop genre in the late 1970s and early 1980s, adding elements of new wave, punk, and glam rock. Some of the highlights are “My Sharona” by the Knack, “I Want You to Want Me” by Cheap Trick, “Turning Japanese” by the Vapors, and “American Girl” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. These songs are full of energy, attitude, and fun, and they still sound fresh today.

## The Moderns

The last part of the playlist brings us closer to the present day, with some of the contemporary bands that have kept the power pop spirit alive. These include “Buddy Holly” by Weezer, “Bohemian Like You” by the Dandy Warhols, “Stacy’s Mom” by Fountains of Wayne, and “California” by Phantom Planet. These bands have added their own twists to the power pop formula, incorporating influences from alternative rock, indie pop, and grunge.

## The Conclusion

Power pop is a genre that has endured for over 50 years, and it shows no signs of slowing down. It’s a genre that celebrates the joy of music, the thrill of love, and the excitement of life. It’s a genre that makes you want to sing along, dance, and smile. It’s a genre that I love, and I hope you do too.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 11-18-23

In early 1980 newspaper The Village Voice published the results of its poll of 155 music critics. Voted the best album of 1979 was Graham Parker & The Rumour’s Squeezing Out Sparks. The rest of the top ten was:

Neil Young – Rust Never Sleeps

The Clash – The Clash

Talking Heads – Fear of Music

Elvis Costello – Armed Forces

Van Morrison – Into the Music

The B-52s – The B-52s

Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers – Damn the Torpedoes

Pere Ubu – Dub Housing

Donna Summer – Bad Girls                                                                                                                                                                  Graham Parker was born on this date in 1950. A handful of his songs are included on today’s playlist.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 7-30-23

As it achieved massive success just last year, many younger people think that Kate Bush’s “Running Up That Hill” was written this decade, but the truth is Kate wrote the song back in 1492, during the Spanish Inquisition. Believe me. I know. I was the one who taught her how to play the synthesizer.

Kate Bush turns 558 years old today, or 65 if you wanna go by Wikipedia, the website invented by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz in 1695. Lots of her musical goodness is on today’s playlist.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 7-28-23

Devo’s “Whip It” was inspired by a magazine article about how to be a better wife. The song’s cowriter and bassist for the band, Gerald Casale, said he’d found that story in a 1962 issue of The Family Handyman and thought it was funny. He decided to write a song that parodied the idea of whipping your problems away. Casale also drew from communist propaganda posters and a 1973 novel by Thomas Pynchon called Gravity’s Rainbow, which mocks capitalist slogans with satirical limericks.He wrote lyrics that taken out of context sound like motivational clichés: When a good time turns around, you must whip it. Give the past a slip. Whip it into shape. Get straight. Go forward. Move ahead. And my personal favorite: Before the cream sits out too long, you must whip it.

Jerry Casale turns 75 today. A couple of Devo tracks, including their biggest hit, “Whip It,” are included on today’s playlist.

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