Tunes Du Jour Presents 2017

In the realm of music, 2017 proved to be a year of vibrant eclecticism, where established artists continued to push boundaries and emerging voices made their mark. The year’s soundtrack was a rich collection of narratives, each song telling its own story, whether it be Kendrick Lamar’s thought-provoking lyricism on “HUMBLE.”, or Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow,” an anthem of confidence and empowerment.

The year also saw artists like Future and Lil Uzi Vert pushing the boundaries of rap music, while Lorde and Portugal. The Man offered a more introspective take on pop. Drake’s “Passionfruit” and Calvin Harris’ “Slide” were the smooth, rhythmic tracks that became the backdrop of many summer nights, showcasing the seamless blend of R&B and electronic music.

Veterans like Harry Styles and Miley Cyrus reinvented themselves, leaving behind their pure pop personas for more mature, soulful expressions in “Sign of the Times” and “Malibu,” respectively. Meanwhile, SZA and Sampha delivered deeply personal albums that spoke to the complexities of relationships and self-discovery.

The indie scene was no less vibrant, with King Krule, St. Vincent, and The War on Drugs each offering a unique sonic experience that defied mainstream trends. And let’s not forget the poignant comeback of Kesha, who reminded us of the redemptive power of music.

As we reminisce about the tunes of 2017, it’s impossible not to feel the excitement and energy they brought into our lives. Each track on this playlist brings its own flavor to the table. It’s not just about the songs; it’s about the memories they evoke, the feelings they stir, and the way they become the soundtrack to our lives. Let’s crank up the volume, lose ourselves in the melodies, and celebrate the music of 2017.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents Dr. Dre

Dr. Dre is one of the most influential figures in hip-hop history. As a rapper, producer, and entrepreneur, he has shaped the sound and culture of rap music for over three decades. He is also a philanthropist who has donated millions of dollars to various causes, especially in the fields of arts, technology, and education. However, he is not without controversy, as he has faced accusations of misogyny and violence against women throughout his career. In this blog post, we will explore the achievements and challenges of Dr. Dre, and how his music reflects his life story.

Dr. Dre was born Andre Romelle Young in 1965 in Compton, California, a city notorious for its gang violence and poverty. He began his musical career as a DJ and a member of the electro group World Class Wreckin’ Cru in the early 1980s. He then joined forces with Eazy-E, Ice Cube, MC Ren, and DJ Yella to form N.W.A, a group that pioneered what became known as gangsta rap and brought the realities of the streets to the mainstream. Their second album, Straight Outta Compton (1988), was a landmark in hip-hop, featuring songs like “Fuck tha Police,” “Express Yourself,” and the title track, which showcased Dre’s production skills and the group’s raw and rebellious lyrics.

However, N.W.A soon fell apart due to internal conflicts and legal disputes. Dre left the group and co-founded Death Row Records with Suge Knight in 1991. He released his solo debut album, The Chronic, in 1992, which introduced the G-funk style, a subgenre of rap that used heavy samples of funk music, synthesizers, and melodic hooks. The album was a huge success, spawning hits like “Nuthin’ but a ‘G’ Thang,” “Let Me Ride,” and “Dre Day.” It also featured the debut of Snoop Doggy Dogg, who became one of Dre’s most frequent collaborators and protégés.

In 1996, Dre left Death Row Records after a violent incident with Knight and founded his own label, Aftermath Entertainment. He faced some initial setbacks, as his first compilation album, Dr. Dre Presents: The Aftermath, received mixed reviews and sales. However, he bounced back in 1999 with his second solo album, 2001, which was another commercial and critical hit. The album featured songs like “Still D.R.E.”, “Forgot About Dre,” and “The Next Episode,” which reaffirmed Dre’s status as a rap icon.

Dre also established himself as a prolific and influential producer, working with artists such as Eminem, 50 Cent, The Game, Kendrick Lamar, and many others. He helped launch the careers of some of the biggest names in rap, and earned multiple Grammy Awards and accolades for his production work. He also expanded his business ventures, co-founding Beats Electronics, a company that produces headphones, speakers, and streaming services. In 2014, he sold the company to Apple for $3 billion, making him one of the richest and most powerful figures in the music industry.

Despite his success and fame, Dre has also faced criticism and controversy for his treatment of women. He has been accused of assaulting and abusing several women, including his former girlfriend Michel’le, TV host Dee Barnes, and rapper Tairrie B. He has also been called out for his misogynistic lyrics, which often degrade and objectify women. Some of his songs, such as “Bitches Ain’t Shit,” have been seen as glorifying violence and rape against women.

Dre has apologized for his past actions and expressed regret for his mistakes. He has also tried to distance himself from his violent and sexist image, and focus on his positive contributions to society. He has donated millions of dollars to various causes, such as the USC Jimmy Iovine and Andre Young Academy for Arts, Technology and the Business of Innovation, which he co-founded with music executive Jimmy Iovine in 2013. The academy aims to foster creativity and innovation among students from diverse backgrounds and disciplines. He has also supported other initiatives, such as the Compton High School Performing Arts Center, the Global Fund, and the Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Dr. Dre is a complex and controversial figure, who has both inspired and offended millions of people with his music and actions. He is a rap legend, a musical genius, and a business mogul, who has changed the course of hip-hop and popular culture. He is also a flawed human being, who has made mistakes and hurt others, and has supposedly tried to atone for his sins. He is a man behind the beats, who has a story to tell, and a legacy to leave behind. Today’s playlist consists of 30 examples of his best work, either as a rapper, producer, writer, or some combination thereof.

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Throwback Thursday: 1996

When first presented with his brother Noel’s composition “Wonderwall,” Oasis’ usual lead singer Liam Gallagher didn’t care for it. Of course, the song became a worldwide smash. Did Liam come around? In 2008 he told MTV News “I can’t fucking stand that fucking song! Every time I have to sing it I want to gag.” Guess not. What about Noel, the song’s writer? He must like it, right? Here is what he said: “Outside of England, it’s the one song we’re famous for all over the world, and it annoys the fuck out of me. It’s not a fucking rock’n’roll tune. There’s quite a vulnerable statement to it. When people come up to me and say it’s one of the greatest tunes ever written, I think, ‘fucking hell, have you heard “Live Forever”?’”

Oasis’ “Wonderwall” is one of the 1996 songs on today’s Throwback Thursday playlist.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 9-18-23

With his album Boy In Da Corner, Dizzee Rascal, who was only 17 years old when he wrote and recorded the album, became the youngest and first Black artist to win the Mercury Prize, beating out Coldplay, Radiohead, and The Darkness. 

Dizzee Rascal was born Dylan Mills on this date in 1984. Some of his work is included on today’s playlist.

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