Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 3-10-24

My Buffalo Stance is this:

  1. Buffaloes should have the right to choice. Their choice has no direct effect on you.
  2. Buffaloes can use the bathroom that corresponds with their identity. The bathroom they choose has no direct effect on you.
  3. Buffaloes should be free to marry who they choose, provided that other party consents. Who they marry has no direct effect on you.
  4. Buffaloes should be able to go to the mall or the multiplex to see Barbie-Q without fearing gun violence.
  5. Buffaloes should be free to move about where they choose and not be confined to one geographical location.
  6. There should be no restrictions placed on the book a buffalo may choose to read or eat. A buffalo learning about something has no direct effect on you.
  7. Buffaloes can dress and wear their hair as they choose, even at school. How a buffalo styles their hair has no direct effect on you.

Celebrating Neneh Cherry’s birthday today on the playlist.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents Tribute Songs

This playlist consists of tributes to some of the most influential figures in history and culture:

Candle In The Wind – Elton John: A heartfelt tribute to the iconic Marilyn Monroe, Elton John’s poignant melody captures the essence of her tragic life and enduring legacy.

Jackie Wilson Said (I’m In Heaven When You Smile) – Van Morrison: Van Morrison’s soulful tribute to Jackie Wilson celebrates the enduring power of music to uplift and inspire, capturing the essence of Wilson’s legendary performances and infectious charisma.

Vincent – Don McLean: Don McLean’s haunting ballad pays homage to the tormented genius of Vincent Van Gogh, intertwining his artistry with the complexities of his inner struggles.

When Smokey Sings – ABC: ABC’s smooth tribute to Motown legend Smokey Robinson pays homage to his soulful melodies and timeless contributions to music, evoking the nostalgic allure of his classic hits.

Pride (In The Name Of Love) – U2: With soaring vocals and stirring lyrics, U2’s anthem commemorates the life and legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., inspiring listeners to carry on his message of love and equality.

The Late Great Johnny Ace – Paul Simon: Paul Simon’s poignant tribute to rhythm and blues singer Johnny Ace reflects on the tragic circumstances of his untimely death, capturing the essence of his brief yet impactful career.

Nightshift – Commodores: A soulful tribute to the legendary soul singers Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson, the Commodores’ “Nightshift” celebrates their contributions to music and honors their enduring impact.

King Tut – Steve Martin: Steve Martin’s irreverent tribute to the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun celebrates the enduring fascination with ancient history and the enduring legacy of one of its most iconic figures.

Man On The Moon – R.E.M.: R.E.M.’s enigmatic ode to the enigmatic Andy Kaufman captures the essence of his eccentricity and genius, inviting listeners to ponder the mysteries of his life and art.

Andy Warhol – David Bowie: David Bowie’s avant-garde homage to pop artist Andy Warhol captures the essence of his enigmatic persona and artistic vision, reflecting on his influence on contemporary culture and creativity.

Abraham Martin And John – Dion: Through Dion’s soulful rendition, “Abraham Martin And John” tenderly remembers the legacies of Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., and John F. Kennedy, reflecting on their enduring influence on American history.

Rock and Roll Heaven – The Righteous Brothers: The Righteous Brothers’ soul-stirring tribute to fallen rock ‘n’ roll stars celebrates their enduring legacy and contributions to music, offering a heartfelt homage to their memory.

All Those Years Ago – George Harrison: George Harrison’s heartfelt tribute to his late bandmate John Lennon not only reminisces about their time together in The Beatles but also serves as a poignant reflection on love, loss, and the passage of time.

Big Train (From Memphis) – John Fogerty: John Fogerty’s rollicking tribute to Elvis Presley captures the spirit of rock ‘n’ roll rebellion and pays homage to the enduring influence of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll on American music.

Biko – Peter Gabriel: Peter Gabriel’s powerful anthem honors the memory of South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko, capturing the spirit of resistance and resilience that defined his legacy.

Tunic (Song For Karen) – Sonic Youth: Sonic Youth’s haunting tribute to Karen Carpenter reflects on the tragic circumstances of her life and untimely death, capturing the essence of her talent and the profound impact of her music.

Emmylou – First Aid Kit: First Aid Kit’s ethereal tribute to country music icon Emmylou Harris celebrates her timeless talent and profound influence on the genre, echoing the purity and grace of her musical stylings.

Brian Wilson – Barenaked Ladies: Barenaked Ladies’ whimsical tribute to Brian Wilson celebrates his innovative genius and enduring legacy as a founding member of The Beach Boys, capturing the spirit of his iconic melodies and harmonies.

Englishman in New York – Sting: Sting’s homage to the eccentric poet and playwright Quentin Crisp celebrates his unapologetic individuality and unwavering commitment to authenticity, embodying the spirit of self-expression and acceptance.

Velvet Underground – Jonathan Richman: Jonathan Richman’s heartfelt tribute to the Velvet Underground pays homage to their groundbreaking contributions to music and celebrates their enduring influence on alternative rock.

Alex Chilton – The Replacements: The Replacements’ infectious tribute to rock ‘n’ roll icon Alex Chilton pays homage to his rebellious spirit and enduring impact on music, capturing the essence of his legendary status.

She’s Madonna – Robbie Williams with Pet Shop Boys: Robbie Williams’ provocative tribute to Madonna celebrates her status as a pop culture icon, reflecting on her impact on music, fashion, and female empowerment.

Happy Birthday – Stevie Wonder: Stevie Wonder’s spirited anthem advocates for the recognition of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday as a national holiday, encapsulating the fervent spirit of the civil rights movement and celebrating the enduring legacy of King’s vision for equality and justice. With its infectious melody and uplifting lyrics, the song serves as both a tribute to King’s contributions to society and a call to action for continued progress and unity.

Elvis is Everywhere – Mojo Nixon and Skid Roper: Mojo Nixon and Skid Roper’s irreverent tribute to Elvis Presley humorously celebrates the enduring presence of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll in popular culture, reflecting on his larger-than-life persona and lasting legacy.

Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way – Waylon Jennings: Waylon Jennings’ classic pays homage to the pioneering spirit of country music legend Hank Williams, reflecting on his influence and innovation within the genre.

Song To Woody – Bob Dylan: Bob Dylan’s heartfelt tribute to folk music legend Woody Guthrie pays homage to his influence on his own musical journey and celebrates the enduring power of Guthrie’s songs to inspire and provoke.

Sweet Gene Vincent – Ian Dury: Ian Dury’s rollicking tribute to rockabilly pioneer Gene Vincent captures the energy and excitement of his music, paying homage to his enduring impact on rock ‘n’ roll.

Bowie – Flight of the Conchords: Flight of the Conchords’ whimsical tribute to David Bowie celebrates his eclectic persona and musical genius, capturing the essence of his iconic status as a cultural icon.

Giorgio By Moroder – Daft Punk feat. Giorgio Moroder: Daft Punk’s electrifying tribute to legendary producer Giorgio Moroder not only celebrates his innovative contributions to electronic music but also reflects on the evolution of the genre and its impact on contemporary culture.

Martin Scorsese – King Missile: King Missile’s irreverent tribute to filmmaker Martin Scorsese playfully celebrates his contributions to cinema and pop culture, reflecting on his unique vision and enduring impact on the art of filmmaking.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents 1989

Although 1989 may not have been a groundbreaking year for popular music, it bestowed upon us an array of iconic hits spanning diverse genres. Take, for instance, The B-52’s infectious “Love Shack,” with its quirky lyrics and irresistible beat that whisked revelers away to a neon-lit haven of love and laughter. Meanwhile, Neneh Cherry’s “Buffalo Stance” effortlessly blended hip-hop beats and funk, showcasing Cherry’s distinct rap-singing style and exuding an aura of boldness and unapologetic confidence.

On a more introspective note, The Cure’s “Lovesong” captured the poignant ache of love’s longing through haunting melodies and Robert Smith’s plaintive vocals. In contrast, Paula Abdul’s “Straight Up” emerged as a pop gem, infusing catchy hooks with Abdul’s signature sassy charm. Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power” thundered onto the scene as a resounding anthem against social injustice, urging listeners to question authority and demand change.

Meanwhile, De La Soul’s “Me, Myself And I” provided a playful yet insightful commentary on self-identity and individuality, solidifying their status as pioneers of alternative rap. Pixies’ “Debaser” shattered musical conventions with its raw energy, while N.W.A’s “Express Yourself” defiantly resonated with those embracing authenticity. Enya’s “Orinoco Flow” whisked us away on Celtic winds, and Young M.C.’s “Bust A Move” had us grooving to its playful rap verses.

Then there were the soulful strains of Guns N’ Roses’ “Patience,” revealing a softer side to the rock rebels, and Madonna’s “Like a Prayer,” a fusion of pop sensibility with gospel-infused vocals that pushed boundaries. Fine Young Cannibals’ “She Drives Me Crazy” pulsated with infectious energy, blending pop, new wave, and soul, while Prince’s “Batdance” defied genres with its blend of funk, rock, and pop flamboyance. Meanwhile, Nirvana’s “About a Girl” hinted at the seismic shift the band would bring to the music industry.

Reflecting on the music of 1989, we’re reminded of its enduring legacy and profound impact on contemporary music. Each song in this playlist serves as a time capsule, transporting us to a moment when music had the power to unite, inspire, and ignite imaginations. So let’s press play and embark on a journey through the sonic landscape of 1989, where every note resonates with the magic of music.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents Joy Division and New Order

Joy Division and New Order are two of the most influential bands in the history of rock music. They emerged from the punk scene of the late 1970s and evolved into different styles and genres, leaving behind a legacy of timeless songs and albums.

Joy Division was formed in 1976 by four young men from Manchester, England: Ian Curtis (vocals), Bernard Sumner (guitar), Peter Hook (bass), and Stephen Morris (drums). They were inspired by the energy and attitude of the Sex Pistols, but they soon developed their own distinctive sound and vision. Their music was dark, atmospheric, and haunting, reflecting the bleakness and alienation of their industrial surroundings. Their lyrics were poetic, complex, and literary, dealing with themes such as love, death, isolation, and mental illness. Curtis, who suffered from epilepsy and depression, delivered his vocals with a deep, expressive, and sometimes erratic voice.

Joy Division released two albums in their short career: Unknown Pleasures (1979) and Closer (1980). Both are considered masterpieces of post-punk, a genre that emerged after the initial wave of punk and experimented with new sounds and influences. Joy Division’s songs, such as “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Atmosphere,” “Transmission,” and “She’s Lost Control,” are among the most iconic and influential of the era. They also created a distinctive visual identity, with minimalist and abstract album covers designed by Peter Saville.

Joy Division’s career was tragically cut short by the suicide of Curtis on May 18, 1980, the eve of their first American tour. His death shocked and saddened the music world, and also mythologized the band as a symbol of intensity and authenticity. Joy Division’s music has inspired countless artists across genres and generations, from U2 and Radiohead to Nine Inch Nails and The Killers.

After the death of Curtis, the remaining members of Joy Division decided to continue making music under a new name: New Order. They were joined by Gillian Gilbert, a keyboardist and guitarist who added a new dimension to their sound. New Order’s music was a radical departure from Joy Division’s. They embraced synthesizers, drum machines, and dance music influences, creating a fusion of rock and electronic music that was groundbreaking and influential. Their music was also more upbeat, colorful, and optimistic, reflecting their personal and artistic growth.

New Order released several albums throughout the 1980s and 1990s, each one exploring new musical directions and possibilities. Their most famous and successful song is “Blue Monday,” a 1983 single that is the best-selling 12-inch record of all time. The song is a synth-pop masterpiece, with a catchy melody and a pulsating rhythm. Other notable songs by New Order include “True Faith,” “Regret,” “World In Motion,” and “Bizarre Love Triangle.” New Order’s music has influenced many artists in the fields of synth-pop, techno, house, and alternative rock, such as Depeche Mode, Pet Shop Boys, The Chemical Brothers, and LCD Soundsystem.

Besides their musical achievements, Joy Division and New Order have also been involved in various philanthropic efforts. One of their most notable contributions was their participation in the Artists Against Apartheid project, a campaign that aimed to raise awareness and funds for the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. In 1986, New Order recorded a song called “State of the Nation,” which denounced the racist regime and expressed solidarity with the oppressed people. The song was released as part of an album called Conspiracy of Hope, which also featured songs by U2, Sting, Peter Gabriel, and others. The album was a benefit for Amnesty International, a human rights organization that works to end injustice and abuse around the world.

Joy Division and New Order also supported the Hacienda, a legendary nightclub in Manchester that was owned by their record label, Factory Records. The Hacienda was a cultural hub that hosted many famous bands and DJs, such as The Smiths, The Stone Roses, Madonna, and Happy Mondays. It was also a place where people of different backgrounds, races, and sexual orientations could mingle and enjoy music and dancing. The Hacienda was a pioneer of the rave culture, which promoted peace, love, and unity through electronic music. However, the club also faced financial and legal troubles, and eventually closed in 1997. Joy Division and New Order donated much of their royalties and profits to keep the club running, and also performed there several times.

Joy Division and New Order are two bands that have made a lasting impact on music and culture. If you want to listen to some of their best songs, check out this playlist.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents 1991

The year 1991 was a remarkable one for music, as it saw the emergence of genres, styles, and stars that would shape the musical landscape for years to come. Today’s playlist consists of thirty of the songs that defined 1991.

We’ve got slick pop hooks and hip-hop beats, soulful ballads and dancefloor anthems, synth pop and alt rock, industrial angst and Prince.

In late September of 1991, a trio from Seattle released an album that soon became a phenomenon that transcended music and defined a generation. Its first hit single inaugurated a new wave of alternative rock that would dominate the 90s. That song peaked on the pop charts the following year, so look for it when Tunes Du Jour Presents 1992.

For now, take a trip down memory lane and enjoy the musical smorgasbord that was 1991. Thank you for reading, and stay tuned for more posts about music. 

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Tunes Du Jour Presents Covers of Show Tunes

The theme of today’s playlist is cover versions of songs that originated in stage musicals. Here are the songs listed with the shows that introduced them:

  • Mack the Knife by Bobby Darin – From The Threepenny Opera (1928)
  • Till There Was You by The Beatles – From The Music Man (1957)
  • Smoke Gets In Your Eyes by The Platters – From Roberta (1933)
  • Little Girl Blue by Nina Simone – From Jumbo (1935)
  • You’ll Never Walk Alone by Gerry & The Pacemakers – From Carousel (1945)
  • I Am What I Am by Gloria Gaynor – From La Cage aux Folles (1983)
  • On The Street Where You Live by Vic Damone – From My Fair Lady (1956)
  • Everything’s Coming Up Roses by The Replacements – From Gypsy (1959)
  • Send In The Clowns by Judy Collins – From A Little Night Music (1973)
  • I Don’t Know How to Love Him by Helen Reddy – From Jesus Christ Superstar (1970)
  • Hair by The Cowsills – From Hair (1967)
  • Put On A Happy Face by Diana Ross & The Supremes – From Bye Bye Birdie (1960)
  • Losing My Mind by Liza Minnelli – From Follies (1971)
  • Tomorrow by Grace Jones – From Annie (1977)
  • My Favorite Things by John Coltrane – From The Sound of Music (1959)
  • Well Did You Evah? by Debbie Harry & Iggy Pop – From DuBarry Was a Lady (1939)
  • The Man I Love by Kate Bush – From Lady, Be Good! (1924)
  • If My Friends Could See Me Now by Linda Clifford – From Sweet Charity (1966)
  • Summertime by Big Brother & The Holding Company – From Porgy and Bess (1935)
  • Cabaret by Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes – From Cabaret (1966)
  • I Get A Kick Out Of You by Frank Sinatra – From Anything Goes (1934)
  • Don’t Cry For Me Argentina by Festival – From Evita (1978)
  • Somewhere by Pet Shop Boys – From West Side Story (1957)
  • The Lady is a Tramp by Tony Bennett & Lady Gaga – From Babes in Arms (1937)
  • I’ll Never Fall In Love Again by Dionne Warwick – From Promises, Promises (1968)
  • I Love Paris by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – From Can-Can (1953)
  • Night + Day by U2 – From Gay Divorce (1932)
  • There Are Worse Things I Could Do by Alison Moyet – From Grease (1971)
  • Corner of the Sky by The Jackson 5 – From Pippin (1972)
  • I Enjoy Being a Girl by Phranc – From Flower Drum Song (1958)

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 11-19-23

Inspired by an unhoused woman who would sing gospel songs in front of a Washington, DC hotel, the familiar refrain of “la da dee la da da” in Crystal Waters’ “Gypsy Woman (She’s Homeless)” was meant as a temporary placeholder until the real lyrics were written. Here’s to writers block!                                                                                                                                                                           Crystal Waters was born on this date in 1961. A couple of her tracks are included on today’s playlist.

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