Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 3-10-24

My Buffalo Stance is this:

  1. Buffaloes should have the right to choice. Their choice has no direct effect on you.
  2. Buffaloes can use the bathroom that corresponds with their identity. The bathroom they choose has no direct effect on you.
  3. Buffaloes should be free to marry who they choose, provided that other party consents. Who they marry has no direct effect on you.
  4. Buffaloes should be able to go to the mall or the multiplex to see Barbie-Q without fearing gun violence.
  5. Buffaloes should be free to move about where they choose and not be confined to one geographical location.
  6. There should be no restrictions placed on the book a buffalo may choose to read or eat. A buffalo learning about something has no direct effect on you.
  7. Buffaloes can dress and wear their hair as they choose, even at school. How a buffalo styles their hair has no direct effect on you.

Celebrating Neneh Cherry’s birthday today on the playlist.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents 1989

Although 1989 may not have been a groundbreaking year for popular music, it bestowed upon us an array of iconic hits spanning diverse genres. Take, for instance, The B-52’s infectious “Love Shack,” with its quirky lyrics and irresistible beat that whisked revelers away to a neon-lit haven of love and laughter. Meanwhile, Neneh Cherry’s “Buffalo Stance” effortlessly blended hip-hop beats and funk, showcasing Cherry’s distinct rap-singing style and exuding an aura of boldness and unapologetic confidence.

On a more introspective note, The Cure’s “Lovesong” captured the poignant ache of love’s longing through haunting melodies and Robert Smith’s plaintive vocals. In contrast, Paula Abdul’s “Straight Up” emerged as a pop gem, infusing catchy hooks with Abdul’s signature sassy charm. Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power” thundered onto the scene as a resounding anthem against social injustice, urging listeners to question authority and demand change.

Meanwhile, De La Soul’s “Me, Myself And I” provided a playful yet insightful commentary on self-identity and individuality, solidifying their status as pioneers of alternative rap. Pixies’ “Debaser” shattered musical conventions with its raw energy, while N.W.A’s “Express Yourself” defiantly resonated with those embracing authenticity. Enya’s “Orinoco Flow” whisked us away on Celtic winds, and Young M.C.’s “Bust A Move” had us grooving to its playful rap verses.

Then there were the soulful strains of Guns N’ Roses’ “Patience,” revealing a softer side to the rock rebels, and Madonna’s “Like a Prayer,” a fusion of pop sensibility with gospel-infused vocals that pushed boundaries. Fine Young Cannibals’ “She Drives Me Crazy” pulsated with infectious energy, blending pop, new wave, and soul, while Prince’s “Batdance” defied genres with its blend of funk, rock, and pop flamboyance. Meanwhile, Nirvana’s “About a Girl” hinted at the seismic shift the band would bring to the music industry.

Reflecting on the music of 1989, we’re reminded of its enduring legacy and profound impact on contemporary music. Each song in this playlist serves as a time capsule, transporting us to a moment when music had the power to unite, inspire, and ignite imaginations. So let’s press play and embark on a journey through the sonic landscape of 1989, where every note resonates with the magic of music.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 9-30-22

Today’s playlist celebrates the September 30 birthdays of Frankie Lymon, T. Rex’s Marc Bolan, Sugababes’ Keisha Buchanan, The 5th Dimension’s Marilyn McCoo, Johnny Mathis, Butthole Surfers’ Gibby Haynes, Patrice Rushen, T-Pain, The Lox’s Sheek, Len Cariou, and The Brady Bunch’s Barry Williams; and the October 1 birthdays of Youssou N’Dour, Donny Hathaway, Richard Harris, The Shocking Blue’s Mariska Veres, Peaches & Herb’s Herb Fame, Brownsville Station’s Cub Coda, The Capitols’ Samuel George, Jebediah’s Bob Evans, Julie Andrews, Shalamar’s Howard Hewett, and Thomas Leer.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 9-18-22

Today’s playlist celebrates the September 18 birthdays of The Ramones’ Dee Dee Ramone, Dizzee Rascal, The Jayhawks’ Mark Olson, Noname, Bell Biv DeVoe’s Ricky Bell, Frankie Avalon, Xzibit, Dodgy’s Nigel Clark, Kira Isabella, Friends’ Samantha Urbani, and Jimmie Rodgers; and the September 19 birthdays of Pulp’s Jarvis Cocker, Chic’s Nile Rodgers, Mama Cass Elliot, The Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley, Skepta, 10cc’s Lol Creme, Billy Ward, Tegan and Sara, Marshall Jefferson, Brook Benton, Les Savy Fav’s Tim Harrington, Jay Electronica, The Springfields’ Mike Hurst, Eamon, Lit’s A. Jay Popoff, Lita Ford, Rex Smith, Austin Roberts, and Teddybears’ Patrik Arve.

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Throwback Thursday: 1994

Nineteen ninety-four was not one of rock and pop music’s pivotal years. I didn’t realize how lackluster it was until compiling this week’s Throwback Thursday playlist. I always begin such lists with a look at the pop charts of the year being spotlighted. What a sad state of affairs they were in 1994! I found around 15 good songs that peaked in the top 40 that year, and included all of them in this list (except for Ƭ̵̬̊’s “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World,” which is not on Spotify). A few great songs came close to making the Top 40, such as Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer” (peaked at #41) and The Breeders’ “Cannonball (peaked at #44). More great (mostly “alternative”) tracks would have made the Billboard Hot 100’s top 40 if not for Billboard‘s archaic rule that in order for a song to be eligible for the Hot 100, it needs to be commercially released as a single. Record companies stopped releasing many singles in the late 80s so as to force consumers into buying more profitable full-length albums. What that means is the Hot 100, which was supposed to represent the 100 most popular songs in the US, did not represent the 100 most popular songs in the US. And what mad the top 40 in 1994 was a lot of wussy drek. And Kurt Cobain died in 1994. Not a good year for music. Here are its gems:

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