Tunes Du Jour Presents 1982

Nineteen eighty-two was a musical kaleidoscope. New wave, punk, rap, and pop collided in glorious ways, creating a year of iconic sounds that still resonate today. Synth-pop rose to prominence, rock anthems solidified their place in our hearts, and the pulsating beats of new wave and post-disco ruled dance floors and radio waves alike.

It was the year that brought us iconic songs and sounds that still resonate today, like Soft Cell’s “Tainted Love,” a synth-pop masterpiece, and The Human League’s “Don’t You Want Me,” a song so ingrained in our collective consciousness it practically begs to be sung along to. Both are emblematic of the New Wave movement that dominated the airwaves.

New Wave wasn’t the only game in town, though. Rock received a shot of adrenaline with Joan Jett’s “I Love Rock N’ Roll,” a fist-pumping reminder of the genre’s enduring power. Queen and David Bowie delivered the masterpiece “Under Pressure” – a testament to the power of collaboration (and maybe a metaphor for the year itself!). Meanwhile, Bruce Springsteen’s “Atlantic City” offered a poignant look at the working class experience.

The year also marked a significant moment for hip-hop with Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five’s “The Message,” a track that brought social consciousness to the forefront, laying down the reality of urban life with a beat that demanded attention.

Laurie Anderson’s “O Superman” experimented with spoken word and electronic sounds, a heady trip that felt like a message from the future. Afrika Bambaataa’s “Planet Rock” introduced audiences to the future of electro-funk. On the other end of the spectrum, “I’ve Never Been to Me” by Charlene… well, let’s just say it was a unique contribution to the musical landscape.

The Jam’s “A Town Called Malice” captured the youthful angst of British punk, while Madness’ “House of Fun” and Depeche Mode’s “Just Can’t Get Enough” offered a quirky new wave charm.

Pop had its share of fun too. Who can forget The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold?” There was also the infectious “Jack & Diane” by John Cougar, a little ditty about young love in a small town. The Go-Go’s “We Got the Beat” declared female empowerment with a pop-rock punch, while Stray Cats’ “Rock This Town” brought rockabilly back into the mainstream. Even bubblegum pop got a look-in with Bow Wow Wow’s sugary sweet “I Want Candy.”

Nineteen eighty-two was a year where music embraced the weird, the wonderful, and everything in between. So crank up the volume, dig out your leg warmers (optional), and let this playlist take you back to a time when music wasn’t afraid to experiment and have a whole lot of fun.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents Joy Division and New Order

Joy Division and New Order are two of the most influential bands in the history of rock music. They emerged from the punk scene of the late 1970s and evolved into different styles and genres, leaving behind a legacy of timeless songs and albums.

Joy Division was formed in 1976 by four young men from Manchester, England: Ian Curtis (vocals), Bernard Sumner (guitar), Peter Hook (bass), and Stephen Morris (drums). They were inspired by the energy and attitude of the Sex Pistols, but they soon developed their own distinctive sound and vision. Their music was dark, atmospheric, and haunting, reflecting the bleakness and alienation of their industrial surroundings. Their lyrics were poetic, complex, and literary, dealing with themes such as love, death, isolation, and mental illness. Curtis, who suffered from epilepsy and depression, delivered his vocals with a deep, expressive, and sometimes erratic voice.

Joy Division released two albums in their short career: Unknown Pleasures (1979) and Closer (1980). Both are considered masterpieces of post-punk, a genre that emerged after the initial wave of punk and experimented with new sounds and influences. Joy Division’s songs, such as “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Atmosphere,” “Transmission,” and “She’s Lost Control,” are among the most iconic and influential of the era. They also created a distinctive visual identity, with minimalist and abstract album covers designed by Peter Saville.

Joy Division’s career was tragically cut short by the suicide of Curtis on May 18, 1980, the eve of their first American tour. His death shocked and saddened the music world, and also mythologized the band as a symbol of intensity and authenticity. Joy Division’s music has inspired countless artists across genres and generations, from U2 and Radiohead to Nine Inch Nails and The Killers.

After the death of Curtis, the remaining members of Joy Division decided to continue making music under a new name: New Order. They were joined by Gillian Gilbert, a keyboardist and guitarist who added a new dimension to their sound. New Order’s music was a radical departure from Joy Division’s. They embraced synthesizers, drum machines, and dance music influences, creating a fusion of rock and electronic music that was groundbreaking and influential. Their music was also more upbeat, colorful, and optimistic, reflecting their personal and artistic growth.

New Order released several albums throughout the 1980s and 1990s, each one exploring new musical directions and possibilities. Their most famous and successful song is “Blue Monday,” a 1983 single that is the best-selling 12-inch record of all time. The song is a synth-pop masterpiece, with a catchy melody and a pulsating rhythm. Other notable songs by New Order include “True Faith,” “Regret,” “World In Motion,” and “Bizarre Love Triangle.” New Order’s music has influenced many artists in the fields of synth-pop, techno, house, and alternative rock, such as Depeche Mode, Pet Shop Boys, The Chemical Brothers, and LCD Soundsystem.

Besides their musical achievements, Joy Division and New Order have also been involved in various philanthropic efforts. One of their most notable contributions was their participation in the Artists Against Apartheid project, a campaign that aimed to raise awareness and funds for the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. In 1986, New Order recorded a song called “State of the Nation,” which denounced the racist regime and expressed solidarity with the oppressed people. The song was released as part of an album called Conspiracy of Hope, which also featured songs by U2, Sting, Peter Gabriel, and others. The album was a benefit for Amnesty International, a human rights organization that works to end injustice and abuse around the world.

Joy Division and New Order also supported the Hacienda, a legendary nightclub in Manchester that was owned by their record label, Factory Records. The Hacienda was a cultural hub that hosted many famous bands and DJs, such as The Smiths, The Stone Roses, Madonna, and Happy Mondays. It was also a place where people of different backgrounds, races, and sexual orientations could mingle and enjoy music and dancing. The Hacienda was a pioneer of the rave culture, which promoted peace, love, and unity through electronic music. However, the club also faced financial and legal troubles, and eventually closed in 1997. Joy Division and New Order donated much of their royalties and profits to keep the club running, and also performed there several times.

Joy Division and New Order are two bands that have made a lasting impact on music and culture. If you want to listen to some of their best songs, check out this playlist.

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