Tunes Du Jour Presents 1982

Nineteen eighty-two was a musical kaleidoscope. New wave, punk, rap, and pop collided in glorious ways, creating a year of iconic sounds that still resonate today. Synth-pop rose to prominence, rock anthems solidified their place in our hearts, and the pulsating beats of new wave and post-disco ruled dance floors and radio waves alike.

It was the year that brought us iconic songs and sounds that still resonate today, like Soft Cell’s “Tainted Love,” a synth-pop masterpiece, and The Human League’s “Don’t You Want Me,” a song so ingrained in our collective consciousness it practically begs to be sung along to. Both are emblematic of the New Wave movement that dominated the airwaves.

New Wave wasn’t the only game in town, though. Rock received a shot of adrenaline with Joan Jett’s “I Love Rock N’ Roll,” a fist-pumping reminder of the genre’s enduring power. Queen and David Bowie delivered the masterpiece “Under Pressure” – a testament to the power of collaboration (and maybe a metaphor for the year itself!). Meanwhile, Bruce Springsteen’s “Atlantic City” offered a poignant look at the working class experience.

The year also marked a significant moment for hip-hop with Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five’s “The Message,” a track that brought social consciousness to the forefront, laying down the reality of urban life with a beat that demanded attention.

Laurie Anderson’s “O Superman” experimented with spoken word and electronic sounds, a heady trip that felt like a message from the future. Afrika Bambaataa’s “Planet Rock” introduced audiences to the future of electro-funk. On the other end of the spectrum, “I’ve Never Been to Me” by Charlene… well, let’s just say it was a unique contribution to the musical landscape.

The Jam’s “A Town Called Malice” captured the youthful angst of British punk, while Madness’ “House of Fun” and Depeche Mode’s “Just Can’t Get Enough” offered a quirky new wave charm.

Pop had its share of fun too. Who can forget The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold?” There was also the infectious “Jack & Diane” by John Cougar, a little ditty about young love in a small town. The Go-Go’s “We Got the Beat” declared female empowerment with a pop-rock punch, while Stray Cats’ “Rock This Town” brought rockabilly back into the mainstream. Even bubblegum pop got a look-in with Bow Wow Wow’s sugary sweet “I Want Candy.”

Nineteen eighty-two was a year where music embraced the weird, the wonderful, and everything in between. So crank up the volume, dig out your leg warmers (optional), and let this playlist take you back to a time when music wasn’t afraid to experiment and have a whole lot of fun.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents David Bowie

David Bowie was more than just a singer, songwriter, musician, and actor. He was a visionary, a trailblazer, and a role model for millions of people who felt different, marginalized, or excluded.

Bowie’s musical career spanned six decades and countless genres, from glam rock to pop to electronic. He constantly reinvented himself, creating iconic personas such as Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, and the Thin White Duke. He was not afraid to experiment, challenge, and surprise his fans and critics.

Bowie’s music was not only innovative, but also meaningful. He explored themes such as alienation, identity, sexuality, and mortality. He was one of the first mainstream artists to openly express his bisexuality and to blur the lines between masculine and feminine. He drew inspiration from various sources, such as kabuki theatre, mime, Bauhaus art, and cinema. He influenced generations of musicians, artists, and activists who followed his example of being true to oneself.

David Bowie was a rebel, a hero, and a legend. He changed the face of music and culture with his talent, creativity, and courage. He inspired and empowered millions of people who felt they didn’t fit the norm or the expectations of society. He showed us that we can be anything we want to be, and that we should celebrate our differences rather than hide them. He left us with a rich and diverse musical legacy that will continue to resonate for generations to come.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 8-12-23

I’m generally not one for guitar solos, but Mark Knopfler’s work on this record, particularly starting at around the 4:50 mark, coupled with the main riff, sends me every time.

Dire Straits’ Mark Knopfler was born on this date in 1949. Some of his band’s best work is included on today’s playlist.

https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/6CHpLkNnuZCozgaFTHkQGO?utm_source=generator

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 9-5-22

Today’s playlist celebrates the September 5 birthdays of Queen’s Freddie Mercury, En Vogue’s Terry Ellis, Inner City’s Kevin Saunderson, Al Stewart, Loudon Wainwright III, and The Impalas’ Joe “Speedo” Frazier; and the September 6 birthdays of Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters, The Cranberries’ Delores O’Riordan, Jimmy Reed, The Cardigans’ Nine Persson, Macy Gray, Sylvester, N.O.R.E./Noreaga, CeCe Peniston, Nightcrawlers’ John Reid, Dum Dum Girls’ Dee Dee, and Foxy Brown.

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