Tunes Du Jour Presents 1968

In the tumultuous year of 1968, the world was ablaze with social and political upheaval, and the music of the time resonated deeply with the spirit of change. As we reflect on the sounds that defined this pivotal era, it’s impossible not to be swept away by the eclectic mix of genres and emotions that filled the airwaves. From soulful ballads to psychedelic rock anthems, the music of 1968 was a reflection of the turbulent times in which it was created.

One cannot delve into the musical landscape of 1968 without acknowledging the timeless classics that continue to capture hearts and minds today. Marvin Gaye’s “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” remains a soulful testament to the power of love and betrayal, while The Beatles’ “Hey Jude” stands as an enduring anthem of hope and resilience. Meanwhile, Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” evokes a sense of quiet contemplation amidst the chaos, its melancholic melody lingering long after the last note fades away.

The year also saw the rise of revolutionary artists who pushed the boundaries of conventional sound and style. Jimi Hendrix’s electrifying rendition of Bob Dylan’s “All Along The Watchtower” redefined the possibilities of guitar-driven rock, while Sly & the Family Stone’s “Dance To The Music” infused funk with a vibrant energy that transcended racial and cultural divides. Steppenwolf’s “Born To Be Wild” became the anthem of a generation, capturing the restless spirit of rebellion that coursed through the veins of youth around the world.

Each track on this playlist is a testament to the power of music to unite, inspire, and console, even in the darkest of times. Let us remember the year that was 1968 and the enduring legacy of the artists who helped shape it.

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Tunes Du Jour Presents The Everly Brothers

Don and Phil Everly were rock and roll pioneers, combining elements of different musical traditions and creating a distinctive sound that inspired generations of artists. Their songs are timeless classics, full of emotion and harmony.

The Everly Brothers started their musical career singing with their parents on the radio in the 1940s. They learned the art of close harmony singing from their father, Ike, who was a master of the thumbpicking guitar style of western Kentucky. They also absorbed influences from the folk, country, and blues music of their region, as well as from the pop and R&B hits of the day. They began writing and recording their own songs in 1956, and soon caught the attention of Chet Atkins, who helped them get a deal with Cadence Records. Their first hit, “Bye Bye Love”, written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant, was released in 1957 and reached No. 1 on the country and pop charts. It was followed by a string of hits, many of them also written by the Bryants, such as “Wake Up Little Susie”, “All I Have to Do Is Dream”, and “Bird Dog”. The Everly Brothers’ songs captured the joys and sorrows of teenage life, with catchy hooks, witty lyrics, and expressive vocals.

In 1960, the Everly Brothers moved to Warner Bros. Records, where they had more creative freedom and control. They wrote some of their own songs, such as “Cathy’s Clown” and “When Will I Be Loved?”, and also recorded songs by other writers, such as “Let It Be Me” and “Crying in the Rain,” the latter being the third top ten pop songwriting credit for Carole King. They experimented with different sounds and styles, incorporating elements of rockabilly, country, and pop. The Everly Brothers’ music was influential to many artists, especially in the 1960s, when the Beatles, the Beach Boys, the Byrds, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others cited them as an inspiration.

The Everly Brothers’ legacy is undeniable and enduring. They have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Country Music Hall of Fame, and the Musicians Hall of Fame. They have received numerous awards and honors, such as the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences Trustees Award, and the BMI Icon Award. They have sold over 80 million records worldwide, and have had over 30 top 40 hits.

If you are a fan of the Everly Brothers, or if you want to discover their music for the first time, I invite you to listen to this playlist that I have curated. It includes some of their most popular and memorable songs, as well as some of their lesser-known gems. I hope you enjoy the Everly Brothers’ harmony and history, and appreciate their contribution to music.

Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 11-4-22

Today’s playlist celebrates the November 4 birthdays of Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s Efrim Menuck, Squeeze’s Chris Difford, Diddy, Fat Boys’ Kool Rock-Ski, and Frances Faye; and the November 5 birthdays of Simon & Garfunkel’s Art Garfunkel, The Byrds’ Gram Parsons, Ike Turner, Ryan Adams, Bryan Adams, Inner City’s Paris Grey, Herman’s Hermits’ Peter Noone, A Flock of Seagulls’ Mike Score, Charles Bradley, Loleatta Holloway, Fishbone’s Angelo Moore, and Dominatrix’s Dominique Davalos.

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Your (Almost) Daily Playlist: 10-12-22

Today’s playlist celebrates the October 12 birthdays of The Temptations’ Melvin Franklin, The Damned’s Dave Vanian, Sam & Dave’s Sam Moore, The Smithereens’ Pat DiNizio, Jane Siberry, Luciano Pavarotti, and New Boyz’ Dominic “Legacy” Thomas; and the October 13 birthdays of Simon & Garfunkel’s Paul Simon, Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke, Chicago’s Robert Lamm, Anthrax’s Joey Belladonna, BTS’s Jimin, John Ford Coley, Lumidee, Van Halen’s Sammy Hagar, Dorothy Moore, Cherrelle, The Joy Formidable’s Rhiannon “Ritzy” Bryan, Marie Osmond, Ashanti, New Boyz’ Ben J, and Joe Dolce.

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